Home Featured Stories Let’s talk about baggage – trash baggage / Parlons accumulation : l’accumulation...

Let’s talk about baggage – trash baggage / Parlons accumulation : l’accumulation de déchets

300

With the dawn of a New Year comes a new slate – and with it, a steady stream of New Year’s resolutions. 

You may love them, you may dread them, but you’ve definitely heard of them. 

Some individuals create goals oriented toward their health, be it exercise, fitness, or diet related. Some tend to favour financial goals: Making coffee at home rather than purchasing it daily, thus saving more money. A lot of these resolutions comfort people after holiday spending and eating, and helps them get on track in pursuing their ideal selves.

This makes perfect sense as the holidays are a busy time filled with family, friends, food, presents and plenty of spirit(s). For some, it is a restful time to enjoy the company of loved ones – for others, tension may exist between family members, the stress of gift buying may weigh heavily, either way, baggage begins to build up: trash baggage, that is.

According to Zero Waste Canada, a Vancouver-based advocacy group, the amount of waste produced over the holidays is estimated at 25 per cent more than any other time of the year. This is, in large part, due to the approximately 3000 tonnes of foil, 2.6 billion Christmas cards and six million rolls of tape purchased by Canadians annually in the month of December. Altogether, this amounts to 540,000 tons of wrapping paper and gift bag-related waste each year. 

What better New Year’s resolution than to reduce, not only your holiday waste, but your environmental footprint daily, thereby playing your part in maintaining a clean, green environment for generations to come. It truly would be the ‘gift that keeps on giving.’ 

 So, let’s talk trees. 

If you have an artificial tree, the best thing you can do is package it back into its box and reuse it again next holiday season. It is important to note that a lot of greenhouse gasses are emitted during the production of artificial trees (National Geographic). In addition, they pollute the earth further once families are finished with them, occupying landfills, garbage sites, or being incinerated as they are constructed of polyvinyl chloride plastic, and do not degrade (National Geographic). “An artificial tree must be kept in service for 15-20 years in order to achieve equal environmental impact to an equivalent number of natural trees,” according to Dovetail Partners Analysis. A 2009 study conducted by Ellipsos (a Canadian consulting firm) estimated the average lifespan of an artificial tree is only six years.

Although one might not suspect it, naturally grown evergreens tend to be the more environmentally friendly option according to NASA, California Institute of Technology. This depends on many factors, such as how long of a drive you take to purchase the tree and how you dispose of it. Here are a few things to keep in mind

  • Holiday evergreens are grown on farms, like any other crop. Five to six foot trees take about one decade to grow, and typically, a minimum of one tree is planted for each one cut down.
  • Young trees produce a larger net amount of oxygen in addition to absorbing more carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas. New trees are a good thing, especially if more than one is planted for each one cut down.
  • Shop local. The closer the tree to your home, the less gas emissions you will produce getting it.
  • Consider purchasing your tree from a tree farm to reduce greenhouse gas pollution and packaging waste. 
  • If you’re still worried about carbon footprint, plant trees and foliage in your yard to help compensate. The more greenery, the better! All plants absorb CO2 and produce O2. It will be a win-win for humans, fellow species and the environment.
  • Many cities have a tree pickup day or a drop off centre. If you make the effort to participate your used Christmas tree will be composted for fertilizer or turned into wood chips to maintain city parks and landscapes.

A second important matter is the environmental impact of gifts, wrapping and associated shipping and handling. What can you do to reduce your harm to the environment when it comes to this? Here are some tips for a greener Christmas:

  • Instead of giving material gifts, treat your loved ones to an experience. Get them a gift card to a spa, treat them to a nice meal out, donate to a charity of their choice, or take them to a live show! There are many options depending on each individual’s taste.
  • If you use gift bags, don’t throw them away after. Keep them for future gift giving occasions, such as birthdays, anniversaries and future Christmases.
  • Skip the wrapping paper, ribbons, and tape entirely! Use blankets, towels, old fabric, old newspapers, or nothing at all. This is a great opportunity to cash in on creativity – a challenge for the whole family! Whatever you use, just make sure it is either (a) being reused or (b) reusable in the future. 

As December is another 12 months away, here are some environmentally conscious habits to adopt in the New Year to further reduce your environmental footprint:

  • When you purchase a coffee or tea, consider bringing your own reusable travel mug. Most café’s will comply with this request and some even offer a small monetary incentive (e.g., a 10-30¢ discount). This trick also works for cold beverages and at many smoothie shops.
  • Say “no” to one-use plastics, especially disposable water bottles and straws. Many of these products contain chemicals harmful to one’s health, such as BPA and pollute the earth’s land and oceans. Instead, invest in a quality water bottle and reusable straw. Even plastic reusable water bottles can get hundreds to thousands of uses before they break.
  • Shop local. Buying your produce, meats, and dairy from farmers markets this reduces the environmental impact of transportation and packaging and supports local businesses. Angus, Barrie and Alliston as well as numerous other local communities host weekly farmers markets.
  • Follow recycling and compost procedures in your area. Simcoe County offers both recycle and green bin pickup. A little effort will go a long way. Did you know? Pizza boxes can be composted by most municipalities. C
  • Eliminate phantom power usage by unplugging anything not in use, such as small appliances (e.g., microwaves, blenders), chargers, and lamps. These items still draw small amounts of power even when they are not being used, which can add up quickly. Alternatively, a smart power strip can manage these plug-ins, so you don’t have to.

Even by following one of the above suggestions, you could make a difference!

Happy New Year from the Borden Citizen!


La nouvelle année, c’est le moment de remettre les compteurs à zéro et de prendre des résolutions. 

Que vous aimiez l’idée ou non, vous savez de quoi il est question. Certains se fixent des objectifs axés sur la santé, qu’il s’agisse de faire de l’exercice, de se remettre en forme ou de mieux manger. D’autres optent pour des objectifs financiers : économiser en préparant son café quotidien à la maison plutôt que de l’acheter au restaurant. Beaucoup de ces résolutions nous réconfortent après les abus alimentaires et les dépenses des Fêtes et nous aident à garder le cap sur la poursuite de notre idéal. 

C’est tout à fait logique : qui dit Fêtes dit famille, amis, nourriture, cadeaux et animation. Pour certains, c’est un moment de détente en compagnie de ses proches. Pour d’autres, le stress que causent les tensions familiales et l’achat de cadeaux peut peser lourd. Mais d’une manière ou d’une autre, il en résulte de l’accumulation : on parle ici de déchets, bien sûr.  

Selon Zero Waste Canada, un groupe environnementaliste de Vancouver, les Canadiens produiraient pendant les Fêtes 25 % plus de déchets que pendant toute autre période de l’année. Cette situation est en grande partie attribuable aux quelque 3 000 tonnes de papier d’emballage, six millions de rouleaux de ruban gommé et 2,6 milliards de cartes de souhaits qui se vendent au pays en décembre. En tout, ce sont 540 000 tonnes de papier d’emballage, sacs cadeaux et autres qui finissent à la poubelle chaque année.

Quelle meilleure résolution pour le Nouvel An que de réduire non seulement la quantité de déchets que nous produisons pendant les Fêtes, mais également notre empreinte environnementale quotidienne pour laisser aux générations à venir une planète en santé! Ne serait ce pas là le véritable sens de « donner au suivant »?

Qu’en est-il des arbres?

Si vous avez un sapin artificiel, la meilleure chose à faire est de le remettre dans sa boîte et de le réutiliser d’année en année. En effet, la production d’un arbre artificiel émet beaucoup de gaz à effet de serre (National Geographic). Et une fois qu’on en a fini, il continue de polluer : il se retrouve à la décharge ou encore il est incinéré puisqu’il est fait de plastique polychlorure de vinyle, une matière qui ne se décompose pas (National Geographic). Selon Dovetail Partners, il faut de quinze à vingt ans d’utilisation pour que l’impact environnemental d’un arbre artificiel soit égal à celui d’un arbre naturel. Or, selon une étude menée en 2009 par Ellipsos (une société d’experts-conseils canadienne), la durée de vie moyenne d’un sapin artificiel n’est que de trois à six ans.

Contrairement à ce que l’on pourrait croire, le sapin naturel serait la solution la plus écologique, selon la California Institute of Technology. Différents facteurs entrent en ligne de compte, comme la distance à parcourir pour se le procurer et la façon dont on en dispose. Voici quelques points à considérer :

  • Les sapins de Noël sont cultivés dans des plantations, comme tous les autres produits agricoles. Il faut une dizaine d’années pour faire pousser un arbre de cinq à six pieds et, habituellement, au moins un arbre est planté pour chaque arbre coupé.
  • Les jeunes arbres produisent une grande quantité d’oxygène et absorbent le dioxyde de carbone, un gaz à effet de serre. Les jeunes arbres sont donc une bonne chose, surtout si on en plante plus qu’on en coupe.
  • Achetez localement. Moins vous parcourez de distance pour vous procurer votre arbre, moins vous émettez de gaz à effet de serre.
  • Envisagez d’acheter votre sapin dans une plantation pour ainsi réduire l’émission de gaz à effet de serre et les déchets d’emballage.
  • Si votre empreinte carbone vous préoccupe encore, compensez en plantant des arbres et de la végétation sur votre terrain. Plus il y a de végétaux, mieux c’est! En effet, les plantes absorbent le CO2 et produisent de l’O2. C’est une solution gagnante pour l’humain, les autres espèces et l’environnement.
  • La plupart des villes organisent une journée de ramassage des arbres ou disposent d’un écocentre. Moyennant un petit effort de votre part, votre sapin sera envoyé dans un centre de compostage pour être transformé en engrais ou en copeaux de bois destinés à l’entretien des parcs et des jardins de la ville.

L’impact environnemental des cadeaux, de l’emballage, du transport et de la manutention qui en découlent constitue un autre enjeu important. Comment minimiser le tort ainsi causé à l’environnement? Voici quelques conseils pour un Noël plus vert :

  • Au lieu d’offrir des objets, pourquoi ne pas gâter vos proches en leur faisant vivre une expérience? Une carte-cadeau dans un spa, un bon repas au restaurant, un don à un organisme de bienfaisance de leur choix ou des billets de spectacle; il y en a pour tous les goûts. 
  • Si vous utilisez des sacs-cadeaux, ne les mettez pas aux poubelles. Conservez-les plutôt pour d’autres occasions, comme un anniversaire ou Noël prochain.
  • Oubliez le papier d’emballage, les choux et le ruban gommé! Utilisez une couverture, une serviette, du vieux tissu, de vieux journaux, voire rien du tout. Voilà une belle occasion d’exprimer votre créativité – et un défi pour toute la famille! Quelle que soit votre solution, assurez-vous de réutiliser ou de faire en sorte que votre emballage soit réutilisable. 

Il reste encore douze mois avant décembre prochain. Voici donc quelques bonnes habitudes à prendre en ce début d’année pour réduire encore plus votre empreinte écologique :

  • Apportez votre propre tasse de voyage réutilisable lorsque vous achetez votre thé ou votre café. La plupart des établissements acquiescent à ce genre de demandes et certains vont même jusqu’à offrir un petit incitatif (un rabais de dix à trente sous). Ce truc fonctionne aussi pour les breuvages froids dans beaucoup de bars à jus.
  • Dites « non » au plastique à usage unique, surtout les bouteilles d’eau jetables et les pailles. Beaucoup de ces produits contiennent des substances chimiques nocives pour la santé, comme le BPA, et polluent la terre et les océans. Investissez plutôt dans une gourde de qualité et des pailles réutilisables. Même les gourdes en plastique peuvent servir des centaines ou des milliers de fois avant de casser.
  • Achetez localement. En achetant vos fruits et légumes, votre viande et vos produits laitiers dans un marché de producteurs, non seulement vous réduisez l’impact environnemental découlant du transport et de l’emballage, mais vous soutenez les entreprises locales. Des marchés se tiennent toutes les semaines à Angus, Barrie et Alliston et dans de nombreuses autres localités de la région.
  • Respectez les procédures de recyclage et de compostage de votre secteur. Le comté de Simcoe ramasse les matières recyclables et les matières compostables. Il suffit d’un petit effort pour accomplir beaucoup. Saviez-vous que la plupart des municipalités compostent les boîtes de pizza?
  • Débranchez les appareils que vous n’utilisez pas, comme les petits électroménagers (four à micro-ondes, mélangeurs), les chargeurs et les lampes pour éliminer les charges fantômes. En effet, vos appareils continuent de consommer un peu d’électricité même lorsqu’ils ne fonctionnent pas, ce qui finit par représenter beaucoup d’énergie. Une multiprise intelligente peut régler ce problème pour que vous n’ayez plus à vous en soucier. 

Même en ne suivant qu’une seule de ces recommandations, vous agirez concrètement en faveur de l’environnement!

Le Citoyen Borden Citizen vous souhaite bonne année!

By/Par: Zoe Cote